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Engineering, generally, is dynamic and Mechanical Engineering in particular is very fulfilling. The workload is a lot and you really have to work for the marks you get but my interest in the program keeps me going. I want to be an Aeronautics Engineer and open a toy factory in Ghana. (Margaret Taylor)

The general principles and basic techniques of mechanical engineering are taught in the first and second years. After a solid foundation has been laid, the student is exposed to the application of these principles in specific areas of mechanical engineering through such courses as internal combustion engines, machine design, etc.

The program runs for 8 semesters spread over a normal duration of four (4) years leading to the B.Sc. degree in Mechanical Engineering. The program has being reviewed to reflect changing trends in industry, increase the use of computers in all areas of the curriculum, challenge the students to generate practical solutions to real-life problems and make students more results-oriented.

Our students undergo a minimum of fourteen (14) weeks of supervised industrial work experience by the end of the program. This is done during the vacations and is expected to give our students a feel of industry. A minimum of 140 credit hours is required for the undergraduate program, which includes a final year project. Examinations and continuous assessments may take the form of thesis, essays, laboratory work, assignments, written reports and oral examinations and there are laboratories for research and experimentation.

CONTROL AND INSTRUMENTATIONS

1.1.1        ME 363 Automatic Control I                                                                        

This is an introductory course in control of systems composing of mechanical, electrical, thermal and fluid elements. General analytical and design tools for physical systems are developed. Topics include basic terminologies in control, types of control systems, system representation and analysis, and computer simulation. Topics explored include:

Fundamentals: Basic terminologies in Automatic Control, Open and Closed Loop Control Systems, Feedback System, History of Control System Development, Application of Automatic Control, Feedback and Feedfoward Control. System Representation: Signal Flow Graph, Block Diagrams. System Analysis: Laplace Transformation, Inverse Laplace Transformation, Transient response, Performance Indices, Stability Criterion (Routh Criterion). Components of Control Systems: Electrical, Hydraulic and Pneumatic, Mechanical and Thermal Components. System Simulation: electromechanical analogies and analogue computers

1.1.2          ME 463 Automatic Control II                                                                    

This course gives a practical treatment of control of engineering systems composed of mechanical, electrical, thermal and fluid elements. General analytical and design tools for physical systems are developed.

Review of basic concepts and mathematical techniques used in Control Engineering. State-space representation of control systems. Frequency response methods. Stability analysis: Nyquist criterion. Controllability for a system of multiple inputs ,Root-locus System design. Nyquist, Bode and other plots. Gain and Phase margins, proportional control, compensator design Control system design and design specifications. Performance improvement and compensation.

 

1.1.3          ME 483 Mechatronics                                                                               

This is an interdisciplinary course which involves mechanical, thermal, electrical and electronics engineering, programming and controls. Topics explored include mechatronics systems control, sensors and actuators, analog and digital control, integration of sensors, actuators and microcomputers including programmable logic controllers, design and programming of microcontroller.

 

1.1.4          ME 464 Instrumentation                                                                            

Introduction to instrumentation. Instrument types and their performance characteristics. Analyses of systematic and random errors during measurement processes. Temperature measuring devices: liquid-in-glass thermometers, thermocouples, varying resistance methods, thermistors and optical pyrometers. Pressure measuring devices: Bourden tubes and manometers. Force and Torque measuring devices: strain gauge methods, load cells and dynamometers. Flow measurements: Bernoulli’s theorem, orifice plate and venture tube. Signal conditioning and recording.

 

VIBRATIONS

1.1.1         ME 362 Vibrations I                                                                                    

This course covers vibrations of single to multiple degrees of freedom systems with and without damping. In addition, it includes design for vibration isolation and suppression, practical considerations in vibration and human tolerance for vibration. The course explores the following topics:

Free Vibration of single degree of freedom linear systems: Harmonic motion, Vibration System Modelling, Energy methods and Stiffness.  Response to Harmonic Excitation: Forced and Base Excitation of Undamped and Damped One-degree-of-freedom Systems, Rotating Unbalance, Coulomb and other forms of damping. General Forced Response: Impulse response functions, response to arbitrary and periodic inputs, transform methods, shock spectrum, Computer simulation of Time response of single degree of freedoms systems using Euler Method. Multiple-Degree-of-Freedom Systems: Two-Degree-of-Freedom Undamped Models, Eigenvalues and Natural Frequencies, Systems with More than Two Degrees of Freedom, Systems Viscous Damping, Forced Systems, Lagrange’s Equations. Torsional vibration systems including geared systems. Design for Vibration: Acceptable Levels of Vibration, Vibration Isolation and Suppression, Practical Speeds of Rotating Disc, Optimization. Vibration Testing and Measuring: Measuring instruments and testing.

 

1.1.2          ME 461 Vibrations II                                                                                 

Vibrations II is designed to reflect on recent advances in vibration Technology and many Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, criteria and increased importance of engineering design, modal analysis and measurement. Topics covered include:

  Distributed-Parameter Systems: Vibration of Strings and Cables, Modes and Natural frequencies, Vibration of Rods and Bars, Bending Vibration of beams. Vibration Testing and Experimental Modal Analysis: Measurement Hardware, Digital Signal Processing, Random Signal Analysis in Testing, Vibration Testing for Endurance and Diagnostics. Introduction to Finite Element Method: Bar, Three-Element bar, Lumped Mass Matrices. Computational Consideration: Influence of Coefficients and Dunkerley’s Formula, Rayleigh’s Method, Matrix Iteration, Computer simulation of Time response of Multi- degree of freedoms systems using Euler Method. Nonlinear Vibration: Single-degree-of-freedom Phase Plots, Equation Linearization, Pendulum, Nonlinear damping and Averaging. Vibration of machine foundations.

 

MECHANICS OF RIGID BODIES AND THEORY OF MACHINES

1.1.1        ME 161/2 Basic Mechanics                                                                        

The same course is offered for different groups of students in the first semester and second semesters as ME 161 and ME 162, respectively. The course explores the following topics:

Units of measurement (SI) and dimensions, Laws of mechanics, Characteristics of a force, force systems and, Moment of a force, Vector representation of forces, Free-body diagrams, Resultant and Equilibrium of system of coplanar and spatial force systems. Centroid: Determination of centroid from first principle, centroid of composite sections. Structural Analysis: Two-dimensional trusses using the methods of joints and sections; Simple frames and Machines. Friction: Laws of dry friction, angle of friction, problems involving dry friction.  Simple Machines: Laws of friction, Definitions and calculations of mechanical advantage, velocity ratio and efficiency, self-locking and overhauling in machines, types of simple machine.  Kinematics of a Particle: Rectilinear, Rotational and Curvilinear Motions of particles, Dependent and Relative Motion Analysis of Two Particles. Kinetics: Equation of Motion for a system of particles.  Work and Energy: Work, Energy, Power, Efficiency, Principle of Conservation of Energy for particles. Impulse and Momentum: Linear impulse and momentum, Conservation of linear momentum for system of particles. Kinetics of a Rigid Body: centre of gravity, mass moment of inertia from first principle, parallel axis theorem, moment of inertia of composite bodies, and radius of gyration. Planar Kinetic Equations of Motion: Translation, rotation about a fixed axis and general planar motion. Impulse and Momentum: Impulse and momentum for rigid bodies.  Work and Energy for rigid bodies: Energy equations for rigid bodies, Principle of Conservation of Energy for rigid bodies. Equation of motion of simple harmonic system, calculations involving period, frequency, displacement, velocity and acceleration, equivalent stiffness for springs in series and in parallel, equivalent mass of a spring, energy method.

 

1.1.2        ME 164 Statics of Solid Mechanics                                                             

Fundamental Concepts: Basic terminologies in mechanics, laws of mechanics, Units of measurement (SI) and dimensions, Newton's Laws of Motion. Characteristics of a force, System of Forces, Vector representation of planer (2D) and spatial (3D) forces.  Resultant and Equilibrium of coplanar forces: Force Systems, Triangle law of forces, resolution and resultant of forces, moment of a force, Varignon’s theorem, free-Body diagrams and Equilibrium Equations. Structural Analysis: Assumptions, Two-dimensional trusses using the methods of joints and sections, Frames and machines. Friction: Frictional force, laws of dry friction, angle of friction, Problems involving dry friction, rope friction, square-and v-threaded screws, rolling resistances. Simple Machines: Definitions, law of machine, mechanical advantage, velocity ratio,  and efficiency, self-locking and overhauling in machines, types of simple machines.  Method of Virtual Work: Work done by Forces and moments.  Centre of gravity and area moment of inertia: centre of gravity and centroid of a body, determination of centroid from first principle, parallel and perpendicular axes theorems, centroid of composite sections, experimental determination of centre of gravity, Resultant of distributed line loads, liquid pressure and flexible cables.

 

1.1.3        ME 261 Dynamics of Solid Mechanics        

Kinematics of a Particle: Continuous and Erratic Rectilinear Motions, Rotational Motions, Curvilinear Motions including Projectiles, Dependent and Relative Motion Analysis of Two Particles. Kinetics of a Particle: Equation of Motion for a System of Particles. Work and Energy: Work, Energy, Power, Efficiency, principle of Conservation of Energy. Impulse and Momentum:  Principle of Linear impulse and momentum, Conservation of linear momentum for system of particles, Impact, Angular momentum, moment of a force and angular moment momentum, principle of angular impulse and momentum. Centre of Gravity and mass moment of inertia: centre of gravity from first principle and composite bodies, mass moment of inertia, radius of gyration, parallel axis theorem, and moment of inertia of composite bodies. Kinetics of a Rigid Body: Planar Kinetic Equations of Motion including Translation, rotation about a fixed axis and general planar motion. Work and Energy for a rigid body: Kinetic energy, work a force and a couple, principle of conservation of energy for rigid bodies. Impulse and Momentum for a rigid body: Linear and angular momentum, principle of impulse and momentum, conservation of momentum, eccentric impact.  Rotary balancing:  single and multi-planes using graphical and analytical methods.

 

1.1.4        ME 262 Mechanism Synthesis and Analysis I                                           

This course is an introductory course in dynamics of machinery. It covers underlying theories and techniques for analysis and synthesis of mechanical systems which consist of planar linkages, mechanical drives and cams. It places emphasis on the use of graphical techniques and computer simulation tools. The topics covered include

Fundamentals: Definitions and terminology, degrees of freedom, types of motion, mechanisms and structures, motors and drives.  Dynamics of Linkages: Analysis of position, velocity, acceleration and dynamic forces in linkages using both graphical and analytical methods.

Graphical Linkage Synthesis: Introduction to type synthesis, function, path and motion generations, Dimensional synthesis up to three positions including quick-return mechanisms Grashof Condition for four-bar linkage, Inversion, introduction to Coupler and Cognates.

Cam Design and Dynamic Analysis: Cam terminology, single and double dwell cam design, displacement diagrams and polynomial functions, pressure angle and radius of curvature, Practical Design and Manufacturing considerations. Transmission of rotational motion: Gears and gear trains including Epicyclic/Planetary Trains, roller drives, belt drives and Chain drives.

 

1.1.5        ME 361 Dynamics of Machinery                                                                

This course is a continuation of ME 262, which is course in dynamics of machinery. It covers: Dynamics of mechanisms and machines in three-dimensions using Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. Balancing of reciprocating masses including linkages, multi-cylinder in-line, radial and V-engines. Vector treatment of laws of dynamics: Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical systems. Fluctuation of energy and speed in machines: crank-effort and turning moment diagrams, flywheels. Inertia forces and torques in mechanisms. Engine Dynamics. Cam Dynamics.  Governors. Gyroscopic motion: simple theory of gyroscopic couple, gyroscopic effects in machinery and vehicles, applications of gyroscopes.  

 

1.1.6        ME 462 Mechanism Synthesis and Analysis II                                         

Logical synthesis of mechanisms.  Freudenstein’s equation. Coordination of Crank velocities. Design of up to six-bar mechanism using algebraic method for a given output function with 4th order approximation.  Coupler Curves and Cognates. Motion and   Path generation for common link mechanisms.  Robert’s theorem.  Error estimation in a given synthesis. Optimisation using Chebyscher’s theorem. High speed cam dynamics. Analytical derivation of cam profiles. Introduction to spatial mechanisms.

 

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING AND SIMULATION

1.1.1        ME 157 Introduction to Information Technology                                  

Introduction to computers. Computer hardware and software.  Windows and word processing, Spreadsheet and Graphic presentation. Internet facilities and electronic mail. Introduction to computer programming using FORTRAN, C++, or any available programming language.

 

1.1.2        ME 158 Computer Programming for Engineers                                    

Overview of various types of Computer Programming: Structured, Object-Oriented, Graphical and Visual Programming. Structured Programming methods using FORTRAN, C++, Matlab, or any available programming language including visual programming in all cases. Software Engineering:  Writing and running programs; Testing and debugging; Compilation and run-time environments Introduction to Databases. 

 

AUTOMOBILE ENGINEERING

1.1.1        ME 487 Vehicle Power Train Systems                                                        

Requirement of transmission system. Clutches: Fundamentals, types, principle of operation, construction of a typical automobile clutch, clutch friction materials, torque capacity and design aspects. Manuel Gearboxes and overdrives: Necessity for gearbox, five speed and synchromesh gearboxes, Gear synchronization and engagement, mechanical power flow,  remote controlled gear selection and engagement mechanisms, splitter and range change gearboxes, overdrive consideration,  setting gear ratio and  performance characteristics in different speeds. Hydrodynamic fluid couplings: Hydrodynamic fluid couplings, principle of operation and construction, hydrodynamic coupling efficiency and torque capacity, performance characteristics, reduction of drag torques. Torque converters: principle of operation, performance characteristics, converter coupling, multistage torque converters, polyphase torque converters, overrun clutches. Semi- and fully automatic Transmission: Automatic transmission considerations, mechanical power flow, three- four- and five-speed automatic transmissions, Electronic and hydraulic control systems.  Other drives such as electro-magnetic transmission, electric drive and hydrostatic drive, their principles of operation, advantages and limitations. Final Drive Transmission: Crownwheel and pinion arrangement, differential locks, double reduction axles, two-speed axles and central differential, four-wheel drive arrangement. Electro/hydraulic limited slip differential.

 

1.1.2        485 Design of Vehicle Structures                                                                

Layout: Layout of light and heavy motor vehicles , Types of chassis with reference to power plant locations and drives, various types of frames, Chassis member joints and appropriate fastening methods, constructional details and materials, testing of vehicle frames, design and loads acting on vehicle frames. Integral body design: design of mountings for engine, transmission and other accessories. Crashworthiness and its influence on vehicle design:  Accident and injury analysis, vehicle impacts, general dynamics and crush characteristics, design of impact collapsible structures and its influence on safety.  Vehicle body engineering: Types-saloons, vans, buses, limousines, sports cars, etc. Design for comfort accommodation: Ergonomics in the automotive industry, ergonomics methods and tools to promote occupant accommodation and comfort.  Driver’s visibility analysis and design, safety equipment for cars. Vehicle Body Aerodynamics: Fundamentals of viscous air flow, aerodynamic lift control, vehicle body drag and reduction devices.

 

1.1.3        487 Vehicle Control, Suspension and Stability                                           

Vehicle Dynamics

Suspension and Tyres: Requirements. Spring mass frequency. Wheel hop, wheel wobble, wheel shimmy. Choice of suspension spring rate. Calculation of effective spring rate. Vehicle suspension in fore and apt directions. Ride characteristics of tyres, behaviour while cornering, power consumed by tyre, effect of driving and braking torque-Gough’s tyre characteristics.

Vehicle Handling: Oversteer, under steer, steady state concerning. Effect of braking, driving torques on steering. Effect of camber, transient effects in concerning. Directional Stability of vehicles. Stability of Vehicles: Load distribution. Calculation of tractive effort and reactions for different drives, Stability of a vehicle on a slope, on a curve and a banked road. Numerical Methods: Approximate methods for fundamental frequency, Dunker-Ley’s lower bound, Rayleigh’s upper bound-Holzer method for close-coupled systems and branched systems.

Vehicle Dynamic Systems Engineering

Steering: steering gearbox fundamentals design, power assisted steering, steering geometry (castor, camber, king pin inclination, Toe-in and toe-out) and wheel alignment, Conditions for true rolling motion of wheels during steering, steering linkages and layout. Suspension: Suspension geometry, body roll stability analysis, Various Types of suspensions (Spring, hydroelastic, hydropneumatic and hydrogas suspensions), absorber, various types of independent suspensions. Braking System: Classification of brakes, drum and disc brakes, theory of braking, mechanical and hydraulic brakes, servo brake, power assisted brakes, Anti-lock braking system. Wheels and Tyres: Functions of pneumatic tyres. The wheel structure, stud and nut fixtures. Major tyre components: tube, tyre valves, carcass, beads, side walls and tread. Merits and demerits of tubed and tubeless tyres.  Properties of tyre: Tractive, braking and cornering,  tyre materials, tyre thread design, vehicle steady state directional stability, tyre marking identification, tyre and rim selections. Wheel balancing.

                                           

1.1.4        ME 486 Maintenance and Management of Automobile                          

Management Training and Operations: Basic principles of supervising. Organization, time and people. Job instruction training, training devices and techniques. Driver and mechanic hiring. Driver checklist, Lists for driver and mechanic. Trip leasing. Vehicle operation and types of operation. Vehicle Maintenance: Scheduled and unscheduled maintenance Planning and scope. Evaluation of PMI program, Work scheduling, Overtime, Breakdown analysis, Control of repair backlogs, Cost of options, Replacement guide lines and trade-ins. Fault Diagnostic and Trouble Shooting. Vehicle Parts, Supply Management and Budget: Cost of inventory, Balancing inventory cost against downtime, Parts control, Bin tag systems. Time management, Time record keeping, Budget activity, Capital expenditures, Classification of vehicle expenses. Fleet management and data processing, Data processing systems- Software. Models – Computer controlling of fleet activity. Energy management. Scheduling and Fare Structure: Route planning, Scheduling of transport vehicles, Preparation of timetable, Costs, fare structure, methods of the fare collection, Preparation of fare table. Motor Vehicle Act: Schedules and sections, Importation and duties, Registration of motor vehicles, Inspection of vehicles, Licensing of drivers, Control of permit, Limits of speed, Ghana highway codes and traffic signs, vehicle insurance. Constructional regulations, Description of goods carrier, delivery van, tanker, tipper, Municipal, fire fighting and break down service vehicle. Automobile Industry: History and development of the automobile industry, market trends, current scenario in Ghanaian auto industry in comparison to some foreign auto industries, Auto ancillary industries, Role of the automobile industry in national growth.

 

1.1.5        ME 488 Automotive Electrical and Electronic Systems                            

Electrical power and wiring: Electrical power system, wiring of petrol cars, diesel trucks and buses. Battery: Principles and construction of lead-acid and alkaline batteries, characteristics, rating capacity and efficiency of battery, Various Tests. Ignition Systems: Types, construction and working of battery coil and magneto systems. Types and construction of spark plugs, electronic ignition systems. Electronic Fuel Injection and Ignition Systems: Carburetor systems. Throttle body injection and multiport or point fuel injection. Fuel injection systems and Injection system controls. Advantages of electronic injection and control systems. Types of solid-state ignition systems and their working principles, contactless electronic ignition system, and electronic spark timing control. Digital Engine Control Systems and performance: Electronic control modules,  Open and closed loop systems, engine cranking and warm-up control, Acceleration enrichment, Deceleration leaning, idle speed control and cruise control. Distributor engine control systems, and distributor less ignition-integrated engine control systems, exhaust emission control systems. Hybrid operation and performance. Electronic dashboard instruments: onboard diagnosis system, fuel guage, security and warning systems. Lighting Systems and Accessories: Insulated and earth return systems. Positive and negative earth systems, Detail of head and side lights, head light dazzling and preventive methods, trafficator, Electrical fuel pump, speedometer, fuel, oil and temperature gauges, Horn, wiper system. Electronic management of chassis system: Vehicle motion control. Automotive Electronics: Current trend in modern automobiles, open and closed loop systems, components for engine management. Sensors and Actuators: Basic sensor arrangement,  types of sensors including Oxygen sensors, crank position sensors, fuel metering, /vehicle speed sensors, detonation sensor, air flow sensor, and altitude sensor. Throttle position sensors, solenoids, stepper motors and relays. Electronic safety mechanisms: automatic braking systems (ABS), Safety mechanisms including electronic seat belts and airbags, child protection systems.

 

ENGINEERING MATERIALS

1.1.1        ME 281 Engineering Materials I                                                                 

Materials Science: Imperfections and diffusion in solids. Phase diagrams and transformations. The structure of metals and other materials:  Properties and processing of engineering materials: Mechanical properties - hardness, ductility, brittleness, toughness, strength etc. Elastic and plastic behaviours. Dislocations and strengthening mechanisms. Thermal properties - Heat capacity, thermal conductivity, expansion and stresses.  Mechanical engineering materials. Introduction to ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Introduction to polymers. Introduction to engineering ceramics. Materials selection.

 

1.1.2        ME 481 Engineering Materials II                                                              

Study of selected materials: alloy steels and cast irons, polymers and composite materials. Heat treatment of steel and cast irons including surface hardening. In-depth study of the most commonly used mechanical engineering materials.

 

1.1.3        ME 482 Engineering Materials Processing                                                

Metalworking: Hot-working processes - hot rolling, hot pressing, forging, extrusion. Cold-working processes - cold rolling, drawing, deep drawing, cold pressing, spinning, powder metallurgy. Casting: sand casting, shell mould casting, centrifugal casting, investment casting, die casting, permanent mould casting. The cast structure. Problems encountered in casting. Casting design. Metallurgical principles of joining metals: welding and microstructure of welds. Inspection and testing of welds. Weldability of specific metals and alloys. Soldering. Metallic corrosion: The mechanism of corrosion - dry and wet corrosion. Stress corrosion, crevice corrosion, impingement corrosion, corrosion fatigue. Corrosion control - Use of inherently corrosion resistant metal or alloy; protection by metallic coatings; protection by oxide coatings; cathodic protection.

 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

1.1.1        ME 391/2 Industrial Engineering and Ergonomics                                   (2, 1, 2)

The same course is offered for different groups of students in the first semester and second semesters as ME 391 and ME 392, respectively.

Historical perspective; Methods Engineering, Methods and Work study etc. Productivity improvement techniques. Demand forecasting. Inventory management. Facility layout. Materials handling, Maintenance management. Total Quality Management.  Human factors in engineering:  A series of topics including machine systems, work conditions and ergonomics.  Industrial Psychology: Motivation, performance analysis and measurement.  

 

1.1.2        ME 491 Engineering Economy and Management                                     (2, 0, 2)

Introduction to management (definition and introduction to the main functions of management). Performance-related emoluments and other incentive systems.  Engineering economy.  Accounting and cost accounting.  Project Management.

 

1.1.3        ME 492 Entrepreneurship Development                                                    (2, 1, 2)

Entrepreneurship and free enterprise. Business planning. Product and service concepts for new ventures. Marketing and new venture development. Organising and financing new ventures. Current trends in commerce  (Internet commerce, e-commerce, etc.). Business Law/Law of Contract.

 

1.1.4        ME 469 Facilities Design                                                                              (3,  1,  3)

The course presents a study of the theory and practice of facilities design: activity and flow analysis, space requirements, layout techniques, material handling, warehousing, location selection, and problem-solving with computer-aided layout techniques. Design projects in plant layout required.

 

1.1.5        ME 457 Discrete Event Simulation                                                              (2, 2, 3)

Concepts of random variant generation, Monte Carlo and discrete event simulation will be introduced. Simulation languages are introduced in this course. One general simulation lan­guage is taught in depth. The use of simulation modelling in design and improvement of pro­duction and service is emphasized. Industrial Engineering design projects will be required. Computer based exercises will be undertaken by students.

 

1.1.6        ME 499 Operations Research I                                                                     (3, 0, 3)

Deterministic models of operations research are discussed with special emphasis on linear programming. Topics covered include simplex algorithm, transportation problem. Network flow, dynamic programming, integer programming, multiple criteria and nonlinear programming models. Introduction to the concepts of probabilistic operations research models and solution techniques. Poisson process, Markov chains, queuing models and their applications, decision analysis, inventory models, risk analysis, and project networks.

 

1.1.7        ME 494 Human Factors and Ergonomics                                    

This course introduces ergonomics and biomechanics concepts. Topics include psychomotor work capabilities, anthropometry, environmental stressors, physical workload, safety, hazard and risk factor identification, work station design, and material handling. Introduction to the elements of cognitive human factors. Human sensation and perception, cognition, information processing, attention, signal detection theory, mental workload, and decision-making. Data collection methods and report writing are emphasized. Lab projects are required.

 

1.1.8        ME 474 Production Planning and Control                                                

This course introduces the concepts of demand forecasting, aggregate production planning, inventory control, project planning, line balancing and job scheduling. Students will be ex­pected to work on projects involving enterprise resource planning and supply chain management. 

 

1.1.9        ME 470 Automation and Production Systems                                          

This course introduces the concepts of automation such as programmable controllers and robotics, design for manufacturing and assembly, material selection, flexible manufacturing sys­tems, group technology, just-in-time manufacturing, process planning, and economics of manufacturing.

 

1.1.10      ME 469 Facilities Design                                                                           

The course presents a study of the theory and practice of facilities design: activity and flow analysis, space requirements, layout techniques, material handling, warehousing, location selection, and problem-solving with computer-aided layout techniques. Design projects in plant layout required.

 

1.1.11      ME 457 Discrete Event Simulation                                                           

Concepts of random variant generation, Monte Carlo and discrete event simulation will be introduced. Simulation languages are introduced in this course. One general simulation lan­guage is taught in depth. The use of simulation modelling in design and improvement of pro­duction and service is emphasized. Industrial Engineering design projects will be required. Computer based exercises will be undertaken by students.

 

1.1.12      ME 499 Operations Research I                                                                  

Deterministic models of operations research are discussed with special emphasis on linear programming. Topics covered include simplex algorithm, transportation problem. network flow, dynamic programming, integer programming, multiple criteria and nonlinear programming models. Introduction to the concepts of probabilistic operations research models and solution techniques. Poisson process, Markov chains, queuing models and their applications, decision analysis, inventory models, risk analysis, and project networks.

 

1.1.13      ME 494 Human Factors and Ergonomics                                              

This course introduces ergonomics and biomechanics concepts. Topics include psychomotor work capabilities, anthropometry, environmental stressors, physical workload, safety, hazard and risk factor identification, work station design, and material handling. Introduction to the elements of cognitive human factors. Human sensation and perception, cognition, information processing, attention, signal detection theory, mental workload, and decision-making. Data collection methods and report writing are emphasized. Lab projects are required.

 

1.1.14      ME 474 Production Planning and Control                                             

This course introduces the concepts of demand forecasting, aggregate production planning, inventory control, project planning, line balancing and job scheduling. Students will be ex­pected to work on projects involving enterprise resource planning and supply chain management. 

 

1.1.15      ME 470 Automation and Production Systems                                         

This course introduces the concepts of automation such as programmable controllers and robotics, design for manufacturing and assembly, material selection, flexible manufacturing sys­tems, group technology, just-in-time manufacturing, process planning, and economics of manufacturing.